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 London's Zoo Photography!

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endogenylove

endogenylove

Country/State : United States
Age : 21
Joined : 2020-04-20
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London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 Empty
PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptySat 17 Oct 2020, 16:56

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] wrote:
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Here is an updated square crop of the tortoise photo. Pardofelis was right, this is much nicer.
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All your series of photos are very interesting and are certainly a reward for great effort. A little too late, I still have to ask you, because no one else did, what happened to a runaway bobcat? Shocked


The bobcat was not actually a runaway, the way the exhibit for the bobcats is set up at that zoo, the indoor part is made to look like a camping lodge and the outdoor part is more naturalistic. So despite the odd backdrop, the bobcat is actually still within his enclosure Wink
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endogenylove

endogenylove

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PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptySat 17 Oct 2020, 20:59

Okay! It has been longer than expected because life is crazy, but here are some photos from the Erie Zoo in Erie, Pennsylvania. This zoo is nice but small, and a lot of the more interesting sections were closed due to covid restrictions. I actually took two trips to this zoo within a week of each other, so these photos are from a mix of both days (of course, there was not much change in such a short amount of time). I look forward to the day this zoo is completely open again to show it off a bit more!

A black handed spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) stares knowingly into the distance.
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A yellow-footed tortoise (Chelonoidis denticulata) co-exists with a larger African Spurred Tortoise (Centrochelys sulcata).
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The african spurred tortoise comes over to see me!
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A Patagonian Cavy (Dolichotis patagonum) illuminated by the sunlight.
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A domestic Pot-Bellied Pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) shows off some wicked teeth.
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An Amur Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) doing what cats do best; sleeping.
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Two Tentacled Snakes (Erpeton tentaculatum) in a tank inside of the Wild Dog Viewing Building, which also houses some reptiles and amphibians.
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A wild-type axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) has a smile-like expression.
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A Southern White Rhinoceros, (Ceratotherium simum simum) grazing on brush.
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An African Wild Dog (Lycaon pictus) sleeping almost out of view. This pack used to belong to the Pittsburgh Zoo, my hometown zoo, until a terrible incident occurred several years ago, prompting the pack to be split up between two other facilities, this one included.
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Two photos of a very inquisitive Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus moluccanus) that show off the light rain on it's feathers.
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A Bennett's Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) wonders if I have any food to give to it.
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An American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) in water that reflects the leaves of the trees above.
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An African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus) spends time in it's indoor habitat, although the door was open for it to go outside if desired.
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A Standing's Day Gecko (Phelsuma standingi) stuck to the glass of it's tank.
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A Burmese Star Tortoise (Geochelone platynota) looks particularly pleased with it's meal.
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A beautiful California Kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula californiae) hiding in the back of it's enclosure.
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A Magnificent Tree Frog (Litoria splendida), one of my favorite animals at this zoo.
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A colony of Giant Cave Cockraoches (Blaberus giganteus).
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A beautiful Red-rumped Agouti marks the second time ever I have seen this species in captivity.
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A jaguar (Panthera onca) lazily watches over everything.
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Although my pictures of the actual cats are sub-par, the tail of one of the African Lionesses (Panthera leo) stuck out from underneath a gate the keepers use to get into the exhibit. No, you could not reach it from the pathway.
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A gorgeous Green Tree Python (Morelia viridis) displays some subtle variations in color under the light.
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A wild American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) making use of a decorative pond.
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A Visayan Warty Pig (Sus cebifrons) gives me a scolding look for waking him up.
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A female Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) has a rather human facial expression.
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Lastly, some images from the train ride that allows access to a pasture with a herd of European Mouflon (Ovis aries musimon) and a rescued female Pere David's Deer (Elaphurus davidianus).
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And that is all the photos I have from the Erie Zoo! The photography in this set could be better, but I am still proud of what I got. Some notable animals I was not able to photograph include the Caracal, Golden Lion Tamarin, Large-Spotted Genet, Prehensile-tailed porcupine, Rock Hyrax, and Sand Cat. Hopefully as the zoo re-opens I can go back and get photographs of some of those species as well. Pictures from Keystone Safari, the Pittsburgh Zoo, and the Columbus Zoo have been taken and are yet to be uploaded, so stay tuned!

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Advicot

Advicot

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PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptySun 18 Oct 2020, 07:12

Looks like a great trip

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"Our planet is in crisis. The monster of this earth, is not a tiger nor a lion or shark. It's us we've destroyed the planet." (My own quote)
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Bonnie

Bonnie

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PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptySun 18 Oct 2020, 14:01

So many lovely animals!! The African Wild Dog is gorgeous!!
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Pardofelis

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PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptyMon 19 Oct 2020, 20:16

I'm tremendously jealous by the Tentacled snakes! Saw only a very far patch of skin of them at San Diego, this species is very rarely kept in Europe and is one of my favourite snakes.
The lion tail is probably the most original photo of a lion in the whole forum!

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endogenylove

endogenylove

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PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptyMon 19 Oct 2020, 21:35

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] wrote:
I'm tremendously jealous by the Tentacled snakes! Saw only a very far patch of skin of them at San Diego, this species is very rarely kept in Europe and is one of my favourite snakes.
The lion tail is probably the most original photo of a lion in the whole forum!
Really? I am pretty sure that every zoo i have shown on this thread so far houses or has housed them at some point, unless my memory fails me. The only problem is that they often hide and are very hard to photograph due to being aquatic animals.
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endogenylove

endogenylove

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PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptyTue 08 Dec 2020, 18:20

Technical difficulties in processing my photos made me forget about this topic for a while, but I am back with photos from Keystone Safari. Unlike all of the other facilities I've shown so far, this was my first trip here, and I was not sure what to expect. What I got was a very beautiful and organized facility with healthy and happy looking animals in (for the most part) large and naturalistic looking environments, and so many species I had never seen before! I will post these pictures in two parts as Keystone Safari itself is split into two parts: a drive-through safari tour and a walk through park.

Starting out with the drive-through images (I sat in the backseat of the car in order to get the best photo opportunities). You could also feed and/or pet most of the animals in these pastures (with some exceptions) but I did not buy feed, as I prefer to photograph at a distance.

A flock of Toulouse Geese (Anser anser) and one other domestic goose look particularly photogenic framed against the farmhouse.
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Llamas (Lama glama) at various ages and in various color patterns, enjoying nice naps and meals in the pasture.
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Three beautiful miniature ponies (Equus ferus caballus) came running over to the car in front of mine to beg for food.
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One of the pastures includes a very interesting mixed flock of Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) and Greater Rhea (Rhea americana) including some albino specimens and chicks! This marks the first time I have ever seen Rhea, and so many and in such variety!
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Another new species for me, the Gayal (Bos frontalis). Two huge and beautiful males are engaged in a battle.
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Yet another new species for me (you may read that sentence a lot here Wink) is the Nilgai (Boselaphus tragocamelus). Here a calf is seen nursing from it's mother.
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A female elk (Cervus canadensis) relaxing in the shade.
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The only picture I could get of a Waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus). I do wish this animal would have come out into the open, as it was another animal I have never seen before.
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A beautiful (and huge) Common Eland (Taurotragus oryx) walking right next to the car in front of me. I ended up just barely being able to touch him as he went by my car as well.
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Portraits of a particularly gorgeous Domestic Yak (Bos grunniens). There will be more yak photos later, but this animal was truly stunning.
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Some members of a gorgeous herd of Fallow Deer. The light was shining perfectly on these animals. In the last picture, one of the animals is shedding it's velvet. The process looks gory but is harmless and natural :)
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A small herd of Pere David's Deer (Elaphurus davidianus) illuminated in the sunlight.
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A herd of the beautiful (and highly endangered) Scimitar-Horned Oryx (Oryx dammah). The only other place I have observed this species is at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C.
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Yet another new species for me, the Banteng (Bos javanicus). Here, a female looks almost as though she is wearing eyeliner. The male can be differentiated by the much darker color.
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Some American Bison (Bison bison), both white and normal color variants. American bison are a very commonly kept species in my area, even my local municipal park keeps a small herd.
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Some more domestic Yaks (Bos grunnieus), this time a lone individual and a mother-calf pair.
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An all-female (that I saw) herd of Blackbuck (Antilope cervicapra) in the distance. Another first for me!
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Some various donkeys and minitaure donkeys (both Equus asinus) found around the drive-through park
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Beautifully speckled Gyr cattle (Bos primigenius indicus) dot the hilsides and reside in the barn.
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Another cattle breed, the much smaller Scottish Highland Cattle (Bos taurus taurus) were very friendly and sociable (and also very wet, as they had just gone for a swim!)
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A close relative of the llama (in fact, one snuck into one of the pictures Wink), Keystone Safari also houses Guanacos, another species I have never seen in person before. They were the last animals I saw as I was leaving the driving section, and a fantastic end.
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That's it for the drive-through safari tour, but tonight I will post pictures of the walking section of the park, which contains some equally interesting species (although not as many rare ruminants!). Thanks for reading :)

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Bonnie

Bonnie

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PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptyTue 08 Dec 2020, 18:24

So many unusual species!! Very Happy It's a joy to see them brought to life in your photos! cheers cheers
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endogenylove

endogenylove

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PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptyWed 09 Dec 2020, 14:00

As promised, here is part 2 of the photos from Keystone Safari, the walking tour!

A Mute Swan (Cygnus olor) on a sky-blue pond.
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Monarch Butterflies (Danaus plexippus) and a Black Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio polyxenes) in the walk-through butterfly garden. These animals are raised and kept inside of a greenhouse for visitors to appreciate. Other species were present, but I did not get good photos.
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A new bird species for me, this Southern Screamer (Chauna torquata) woke up from a nap when I took it's photo.
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Glorious Grey Crowned Cranes (Balearica regulorum) display how fitting their name is.
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The best picture I could get of a new carnivore for me, a very sleepy Bat-eared Fox (Otocyon megalotis). I had to very much become a contortionist just to get this crappy picture due to the position the animal was sleeping in.
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Some Kunekune Pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus), my personal favorite domestic pig breed. I just love the color patterns!
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A wise-looking and rather dark colored Barn Owl (Tyto alba) gazes at me with a judgement only she knows.
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An American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) with a very interesting fur pattern on it's back.
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A Bactrian Camel (Camelus bactrianus) gives me a very condescending look.
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A Rainbow Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao) was very talkative and tried to have a conversation with me. The Green-Winged Macaw(Ara chloropterus), however, only wanted to sleep. For whatever reason, the sleepy Silkie Chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) was also housed in the same exhibit.
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A very friendly Domestic Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) begs me for carrots in the reindeer barn, which houses a mix of normal colored and piebald specimens.
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Also inside the reindeer barn was Marvin, a young domestic yak (bos grunnieus) calf who was abandoned by his mother in the pasture, and therefore was being hand raised. He kept attempting to suckle on mine and my mother's hands.
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Some small animals were housed in the barn as well, including corn snakes, guinea pigs, four-toed hedgehogs, and a new reptile species for me, the Peter's Banded Skink (Scincopus fasciatus).
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Very common but still incredibly adorable, here are some domestic ducklings! (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus).
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Baby Tortoises! I believe that this is a Hermann's Tortoise (Testudo hermanni), but please let me know if I am wrong, as I can't remember.
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A large and gentile looking Aldabra Tortoise (Aldabrachelys gigantea) provides a stark comparison to it's smaller relatives.
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Unlike the other Macaws shown here, Hyacinth Macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) are a very unusual species to see in captivity around here. I have maybe only seen these birds once before.
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Keystone Safari prides (no pun intended) itself on having a small collection of high percentage Barbary Lions (Panthera leo leo), a subspecies of Lion that is extinct in the wild. Whether this claim is true genetically or not has not been disclosed,  but the lions in question are huge, much larger than the typical African Lions I am used to in Pittsburgh, and the male certainly has the trademark black mane of a Barbary Lion. One can come to their own conclusion about the truth of the matter.
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Famously, a cub, Simba, was also recently bred here. By the time I arrived he was a young adult, but still very curious and adorable.
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Two spunky Ring-Tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) engage in a play fight on their island playground.
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Beautiful Australian Black Swans (Cygnus atratus) with the water droplets on their feathers glistening in the sun.
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A Spotted Hyena matriarch (Crocuta crocuta) keeps an eye on her small clan while they nap.
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A screaming White-Necked Raven (Corvus albicollis) was very, very loud. Obviously, he had much to talk about Wink
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Two species of Pheasants (along with domestic chickens and likely some other species that I did not see) inhabit a large pheasant aviary that is unmissable. The reddish Temminck's Tragopan (Tragopan temminckii) was a bit more bold and outgoing, while the unmistakable Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) was a bit more shy.
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Quite possibly the most exciting species to me in the walk through park, here is the Addax (Addax nasomaculatus)! Well known for being one of the most endangered mammals in the world, I have never seen an Addax before! It was housed with the giraffes and another antelope species I will show later.
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A rare bird that I have never seen before, this Red-Crested Turaco looks very comfortable settled down on it's branch.
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I apologize for the terrible quality of this image, but housed with the previous bird is ANOTHER new species for me, the Grey Peacock Pheasant (Polyplectron bicalcaratum). I waited and waited for this bird to come out into the open a bit more, but to no avail.
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A very common bird, but one of my favorites, this Vulturine Guineafowl (Numida meleagris) and it's flock were free-wandering throughout the park, but this one stopped in a perfect light for photography.
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Another ratite to add to the collection of emu and rhea from the first part, here is Carl the Southern Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius). He only came out of his indoor space for a very short time to look at me, pose, and disappear back inside.
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A very loud banging noise alerted me to the presence of this Southern Ground Hornbill (Bucorvus leadbeateri), who was hopping on the tin roof of it's birdhouse to draw all eyes towards it. It worked!
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I couldn't get any good pictures of the adults, but here is the aforementioned antelope housed with the addax, yet another new species for me, the Sitatunga (Tragelaphus spekii). This adorable calf was venturing a bit from mom and experiencing the world.
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And finally, we've come to the last species, (and the last new animal for me), a pair of charismatic King Vultures. Very intimidating and beautiful birds, one had a bit of feather stuck in it's beak.
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I hope you enjoyed and that if you are in the area of Grove City, Pennsylvania, you take a day to stop by and visit Keystone Safari. So many cool species and a very exciting and rewarding trip for me!
My next post here will probably be more Pittsburgh Zoo Photos, as I am still working on sorting through hundreds of photos from the Columbus Zoo. Stay tuned and thanks for reading!

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Bonnie

Bonnie

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London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 Empty
PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptyWed 09 Dec 2020, 14:03

Beautiful, especially the spotted hyena! Very Happy drunken
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lucky luke

lucky luke

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PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptyWed 09 Dec 2020, 15:24

Very Happy Applause cheers Cool
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Kikimalou
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Kikimalou

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PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptyWed 09 Dec 2020, 15:57

So this is not a topic but a trap Very Happy You are not showing only London zoo pics Laughing It’s better like that.
Zoo photography is also my hobby and I wish I could do more pics every year.
The Banteng bull battle is really incredible !
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endogenylove

endogenylove

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PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptyWed 09 Dec 2020, 16:30

It’s a common misunderstanding, but my name is actually London! The pictures are not from the London zoo (I’ve been there but it was many years ago) but are London’s (mine) zoo pictures :)
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Kikimalou
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Kikimalou

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PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptyWed 09 Dec 2020, 16:35

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] wrote:
It’s a common misunderstanding, but my name is actually London! The pictures are not from the London zoo (I’ve been there but it was many years ago) but are London’s (mine) zoo pictures :)
Shocked Laughing I’m confused Embarassed
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Pardofelis

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PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptyWed 09 Dec 2020, 22:52

Excellent! I like very much your enthusiasm when discovering new species :-) The baby tortoises have a very attractive pattern and I alway liked tragopans. The sitatunga calf is really adorable, especially in the first photo, and the royal majesty of the King Vulture is undeniable. And even one species (the skink) would be new for my photo collection!

P. S. Vulturine guineafowl are Acryllium vulturinum, while Numida meleagris is called common or helmeted guineafowl. Both are very common in zoos, but the helmeted is 100 times more common.

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Advicot

Advicot

Country/State : A farm in Britiain
Age : 15
Joined : 2020-01-11
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London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 Empty
PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 EmptyThu 10 Dec 2020, 17:38

Some more amazing photos!

The white goose from 8th December is a sabastopol

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"Our planet is in crisis. The monster of this earth, is not a tiger nor a lion or shark. It's us we've destroyed the planet." (My own quote)
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London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 Empty
PostSubject: Re: London's Zoo Photography!   London's Zoo Photography! - Page 2 Empty

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